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Student Corner

TRAINING FOR EU INSTITUTIONS EXAM

European Personnel Selection Office (EPSO), has announced the new AD Competition. Candidates who want to apply for a work on the EU Institutions (European Commission, Council of the European Union etc) can register on the following link:https://epso.europa.eu/apply/job-offers/competition/2406/description_e

Due to the collaboration of the Diplomatic Academy with Epsopass, you can now practice for free on the Epsopass’ web platform (www.epsopass.com). You can get the credentials by sending an email to: Info@epsopass.com, with the subject: Nicosia University Student.”

 

CALL FOR INTERNS – FUTURE WORLDS CENTER

Are you passionate about making a difference in your community? Are you excited to get involved in global learning and sustainable development? Are you interested to take action?

The Global Education Center of Future Worlds Centers offers you the opportunity to get directly involved with European projects exploring the global food systems, as well as gaining hands-on practical experiences within the local communities.

If you are interested please send your CV and a short cover letter to globaleducation@futureworldscenter.org.

For further info Click to Read.

Click to read
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By Karine Makarian

Dialogue with a Diplomat lecture series

Ever since its conception, the International Relations and European Affairs (IREA) Society envisioned providing a platform for students interested in politics, history and current affairs to broaden their knowledge and explore their skills in the field. Last year was a stepping stone for IREA, which resumed its activities after a hiatus period. During the first semester the Society, with the help of Professor Giorgos Kentas of the International Relations Department, organized a discussion about the Russian- Ukrainian crisis in the form of a debate. In the second semester a lecture was organized by the Society, delivered by the Universty’s Law Lecturer Dr. Antonis Stylianou, concerning the British Sovereign Base Areas of Cyprus. Shortly afterwards, another round of debate gave students the opportunity to discuss the possibility of the Greek debt being forgiven.
The new academic year started with the announcement of a new lecture series named “Dialogue with a Diplomat” in collaboration with the Diplomatic Academy of the University of Nicosia. The objective is to acquaint students with the elusive world of diplomacy by inviting members of international diplomatic service for a short lecture on a topic that concerns their country.
The series kicked off on the 1st of December with Ms. Pamela Tremont, Deputy Chief of Mission of the United States Embassy in Cyprus under the topic of “NATO in the 21st Century”. Ms. Tremont thoroughly explained the historic objective and dimension under which NATO was created in 1949, the challenging period during the Cold War as well as the framework under which it operates today. Throughout her speech, it became evident that with the changes particularly after the end of the Cold War, NATO’s 28 member states are facing demanding global challenges unlike anything they were before.
According Article 5 of NATO, commits a member state to take up military action in case of an attack against another NATO member state, specifically stating “an attack against one Ally is considered as an attack against all Allies”. With the ongoing crisis in Ukraine and the recent violations of Turkish airspace by Russia, many states are urging NATO to take actions against progressive Russian aggression.
Furthermore, Ms. Tremont also noted that Montenegro could possibly be the newest member to accede to NATO after successfully completing the membership steps required beforehand.
The lecture was concluded with Ms. Tremont enthusiastically answering the various questions both University faculty and students posed with the definite promise of further interesting countries taking part in the series.

By Karine Makarian, Major: BA, International Relations and European Studies

Harvard National Model United Nations

On Christmas evening last year, I got an unexpected email from the United Nations Youth Student Association in Cyprus (UNYSA) informing me that I was picked to be a part of the Cyprus delegation to the 62nd Harvard National Model United Nations (HNMUN) conference in Boston, USA!
Immediately after the confirmation emails were sent out to the chosen individuals, a workshop was set up by the organisation committee of UNYSA, who flew in a trained MUN-er from Serbia for a few days, solely to prepare us for the conference. The workshop was expertly organised and attendees were given valuable insight and skills to match those of our fellow delegations in Boston.
With origins tracing back to the early days of the formation of the United Nations, these conferences are organised by school or college clubs, which aim at creating a realistic atmosphere of how the UN works. Countries are represented by students who assume a role and work relentlessly to protect the national interest and impose the policies of the countries they are representing, thus, always remaining within the framework policy of their country.
Days seemed to fly by and our departure date was rapidly approaching. Having chosen our country and committee (Social, Humanitarian & Cultural, also known as the Third Committee of the General Assembly), all of us were hard at work, researching for the topics of our session. Just about two weeks before the conference, each delegate submitted their position paper that summarised their country’s position on the specific matter, mine being Nepal view on the issue of missing children.
9th of February rolled by and the Cypriot delegation took off for Boston, with an extra day in London. It was where I started to get to know my teammate for the conference, Andreas Antonopoulos, an economics student from the University of Cyprus, with whom we ended up spending our entire morning strolling all around London and doing some valuable teambuilding.
When we finally landed in snowy Boston on the night of the 10th of February, most of us were jet-lagged and very, very tired, so all that was going through our minds was sleep. Sleep, however, was not a possibility as the group had to wake up early the next day, get breakfast and then rush off to the opening ceremony of the conference. We would soon find out that, that week was one of the coldest weeks Boston has had in the last few decades. With icy winds numbing the entire face and layers of clothes restricting free movement, each of us walked every day from our hotel to the Boston Plaza Hotel, where the conference was taking place.
Committee sessions were about 3 to 5 hours long (sometimes with only a 10 minute break in between), then a short lunch break, after which there were additionally 3 hour-long debates. The debates were demanding and everyone in our Committee was expertly prepared on the subjects. What was evident, however, was the fantastic balance that students had between competitive spirit and teamwork. In all MUN’s, it is crucial to have teamwork skills as they will ultimately lead you to the coveted resolution. Equally important though, is the sense of competitiveness to propel your delegation forward and stand out from the crowd of over 200 participants.
Through my experience in HNMUN, I learned a few valuable lessons:
1. Never underestimate a seemingly “weak” country. A delegate from a country you have probably never heard of might surprise you during debate rounds (in our case, it was Vanuatu).
2. It’s not about what you know; it’s about which country’s delegate you know. As Harvey Specter from the famous “Suits” series said, “Play the man, not the odds”.
3. Never trust a country that is a signatory in more than one resolution; chances are, they are playing the field or they have no real stance for the topic, therefore, you cannot predict how they will vote when the time comes.
4. No matter how good the proposal is, there will always be a country that will think it’s too expensive. Usually countries such as U.K., U.S.A., Germany etc., are weary of funding clauses in the resolutions.
And lastly but more importantly:
5. Be prepared for defending something your moral code is completely against. Topics in MUN’s are usually less conservative but that’s what makes a great diplomat; being able to argue your country’s position, even though you may not agree with it.
Model UN’s are something that every student should at least experience once in their academic career. Apart from giving a valuable insight as to how the real United Nations works, it is also a great platform to hone in your public speaking, debating and networking skills all the while, having fun at some of the more…theatrical delegate speeches.

By Karine Makarian

Dialogue with a Diplomat lecture series

Ever since its conception, the International Relations and European Affairs (IREA) Society envisioned providing a platform for students interested in politics, history and current affairs to broaden their knowledge and explore their skills in the field. Last year was a stepping stone for IREA, which resumed its activities after a hiatus period. During the first semester the Society, with the help of Professor Giorgos Kentas of the International Relations Department, organized a discussion about the Russian- Ukrainian crisis in the form of a debate. In the second semester a lecture was organized by the Society, delivered by the Universty’s Law Lecturer Dr. Antonis Stylianou, concerning the British Sovereign Base Areas of Cyprus. Shortly afterwards, another round of debate gave students the opportunity to discuss the possibility of the Greek debt being forgiven.
The new academic year started with the announcement of a new lecture series named “Dialogue with a Diplomat” in collaboration with the Diplomatic Academy of the University of Nicosia. The objective is to acquaint students with the elusive world of diplomacy by inviting members of international diplomatic service for a short lecture on a topic that concerns their country.
The series kicked off on the 1st of December with Ms. Pamela Tremont, Deputy Chief of Mission of the United States Embassy in Cyprus under the topic of “NATO in the 21st Century”. Ms. Tremont thoroughly explained the historic objective and dimension under which NATO was created in 1949, the challenging period during the Cold War as well as the framework under which it operates today. Throughout her speech, it became evident that with the changes particularly after the end of the Cold War, NATO’s 28 member states are facing demanding global challenges unlike anything they were before.
According Article 5 of NATO, commits a member state to take up military action in case of an attack against another NATO member state, specifically stating “an attack against one Ally is considered as an attack against all Allies”. With the ongoing crisis in Ukraine and the recent violations of Turkish airspace by Russia, many states are urging NATO to take actions against progressive Russian aggression.
Furthermore, Ms. Tremont also noted that Montenegro could possibly be the newest member to accede to NATO after successfully completing the membership steps required beforehand.
The lecture was concluded with Ms. Tremont enthusiastically answering the various questions both University faculty and students posed with the definite promise of further interesting countries taking part in the series.

By Karine Makarian

 

With a promise to spend five days filled with discussions about International Relations and diplomatic negotiations among states, the Thessaloniki Model United Nations (ThessISMUN) is an event where one can witness Russia and Ukraine sitting at the same table drinking a cup of coffee. For fourteen consecutive years, the University of Macedonia in Thessaloniki has been hosting the annual ThessISMUN with great success.

With origins tracing back to the early days of the formation of the United Nations, these conferences are organized by school or college clubs which aim at creating a realistic atmosphere of how the UN works. Countries are represented by students who assume a role and work relentlessly to protect the national interest and impose the policies of the countries they are representing. During the conference, the delegates must always remain within the framework policy of their country, which means that for example the delegation representing North Korea would think twice before arguing about banning nuclear weapons. For this year, I was given the opportunity to participate as part of the Cyprus Youth Diplomacy delegation with six other students and the President of the organization.

From a variety of committees to choose from as an observer, I decided to attend to the sessions of the Third Committee of the General Assembly which had topics relating to social, humanitarian affairs and human rights issues that affect people all over the world. Delegates from over fifty countries had to come together; draft resolutions and then vote upon them in a matter of four days before presenting it to the General Assembly to be voted on.

The most exciting part of the event was hearing the speeches of the delegates and how passionately they argued in favor of their policies. Furthermore, during the unmediated discussions, one could observe the lobbying being carried out by the states and hearing the art of diplomacy being put forward. It is both an educational and a social experience whereby one can explore the diplomatic environment in the morning and enjoy the city at night. There are so many things I learned during these five days that it would be difficult for me to put into words. However most importantly, this experience gave me an understanding of how decisions are being taken at an international level.